Survivors

Survivors

Sunday, October 2, 2016

This Rose


©  Steve King
All rights reserved


I shall pluck this rose for you,                                    
damp still with the morning airs;                                
every flower is fleeting fair,                                       
but only this rose will do.                                           

I’ll be patient ‘til you speak                                        
(unsought cheers seldom ring true                            
while regrets are clinging new)                                  
though your vigil tends the week.                  
           
I shall embrace all your cares;                        
and endure each new-found grief;                              
share what unkept troths bequeath,                            
I will show how love repairs.                         

Joy shall visit you anew,                                            
and respite from these despairs                                              
which despoil the heart’s affairs,
when I give this rose you.


A new poem for the Poetry Pantry
 http://poetryblogroll.blogspot.com/

18 comments:

  1. The strength of your form in meter and rhyme lend a classical air to your piece. Fine thoughts, beautifully presented.

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  2. What a meaningful gift a rose can be! It has the power sometimes to turn a life (or lives) around! Nice to see you, Steve.

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  3. I hope the person speaks to you soon. Patience is finite. An elegant romantic poem , beautifully crafted.

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  4. So beautiful, especially your closing lines. An elegant poem.

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  5. A clever cycle of words - there is something symbolic about giving flowers..and roses in particularly which seems to float here

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  6. Well written. ...and a great reading :)
    ZQ

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  7. The meter and rhyme makes me think of a classic poem, just like Kerry said... strangely enough with the theme of a rose mending bridges it seems almost like a sequel to Robert Burns' Red, red rose.

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  8. such a sentimental write.
    happy to find your blog, love your title!

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  9. love the simplicity of the declarations and their depth of feelings - a crystal clear sound to this poem

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  10. "I will show how love repairs."
    Indeed it does.
    Enjoyed the rhymes.

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  11. This is a very beautiful poem, I am always captivated by a rose. Even though it has thorns the soft petals are a reminder of the beauty and they smell heavenly.

    The gift of a rose ~ may it bring mending ...

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  12. So pretty. It reads a bit like a renaissance song. I especially like the stanza about the trivial notice we give to unsought cheers as opposed to clinging regrets! A very very sweet poem. Glad your play went well. k.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Karin. And thanks for noting the play!

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    2. Dear Steve, thanks for the kind comment on my poem today--I actually took it down almost immediately after posting--I'm feeling just too low to deal with the blog world right now, and was surprised, but touched, that your comment came through. I may put the poem back up, I don't know. It was so lovely to revisit this rose one--it feels very Shakespearean to me--the cadence and honestly the whole trope of the rose--if one can focus on the beauty in front of one, it certainly does help with care. Thanks again. k.

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  13. Ah, to lift the burden of another's cares. It is never the "rose," but the thought and meaning that is behind it that matters most. Nicely captured, Steve.

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  14. I hope this finds you and yours doing well. May we display your header on our new site directory? As it is now, the site title (linked back to its home page) is listed, and we think displaying the header will attract more attention. In any event, we hope you will come by and see what is going on at SiteHoundSniffs.com.

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  15. There is always that gift of heart when most we need it, or at least if one is lucky enough. Beautiful, simple and informed with a mature judgement, yet also just itself, an offering of what matters most. Good to see you writing, Steve--I read about half of your long poem above, which is so evocative of a more leisurely, introspective time when poets could write out their full thoughts and moods and make an entire tapestry, a full narrative--will try to return and finish after the hectic holidays.

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